About the Callier Library

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Callier Library is a satellite facility of The University of Texas at Dallas, McDermott Library. It is located at the Dallas, Texas campus of the Callier Center for Communication Disorders. The library supports the graduate-level programs and faculty in communications sciences which are located at the center. It also supports the work of clinicians in hearing and speech disorders who work at both campuses of the Callier Center. One of the missions of Callier Library is to be a useful source of information to the international community of researchers and clinicians in communication disorders. To that end, this web log of citations and news in the field has been built and maintained by Allen Clayton, the Callier Center Librarian.

Note: These news items are gleaned from over 600 sources on the Internet and are provided as a service to our patrons. The University of Texas at Dallas does not guarantee the veracity, reliability or completeness of any information provided on this page, in the comments, or in any hyperlink appearing on this page

  1. Have a nice day !

  2. Great site! I’ve added you to my blogroll at languagefix.wordpress.com

  3. I AMIT SHARMA IS GRADUATE STUDENT OF SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY IN AYJNIHH KOLKATA,INDIA. I WANT TO ACCESSS THE FULL PAPER IN THIS WEBSITE.
    KINDLY SUGGEST ME THE PROCEDURE.

    THANKING YOU,
    AMIT SHARMA

    • Unfortunately, US Copyright Law restricts Callier Library from providing document delivery service to non-UTD affiliates. You can either try to get the article through an interlibrary loan service at a library with which you are affiliated or purchase it directly from the publisher.

  4. Hello,

    There’s a new book for kids who stutter that is really making some noise. The book is titled Stuttering Stan Takes a Stand, and it’s about a little squirrel who stutters and how his disability affects his life and those around him. The reviews and endorsements for this book are fantastic, and rightfully so. I would highly recommend it to your readers. For parents who have children that stutter, this book is a must have. You can read about it on the home page of The National Stuttering Association, and Speechpathology.com. Both links are listed below. The reviews can be found at the end of the article on The National Stuttering Association link.

    The National Stuttering Association

    http://www.nsastutter.org/newdetails/index.php?id=226

    Speechpathology.com

    http://www.speechpathology.com/interview/interview_detail.asp?interview_id=1138

    Thank you and best wishes.

    Lyla

  5. Hello, I am delighted to find this blog and discover a library specialising in the same subject as my own. Here in England we are the National Information Centre for Speech-Language Therapy (NICeST – it’s “therapy” rather than “pathology” over here). I’d like to add a link to your library from our site if that’s ok?
    Best wishes
    Stevie

  6. Hi
    Thank you – yes of course you can link to our library site. I have now added the Callier Library to my links page under Information Resources – and you are Resource of the Week on my blog!
    -Stevie

  7. kathleen roman

    I am attempting to find articles by respected researchers and published in reputable journals that supports the contention that children who appeared to be progressing normally and who then undergo a profound regression, e.g., loss of speech and vocabulary and onset of swallowing/feeding issues benefit from early interventions and aggressive therapy. Thank you for any suggestions you can share. KMR

  8. Stumbled on this as a related article to one of my blog posts. I have heard of Callieractually, from a friend and colleague from NSA, Russ Hicks. I am sure you have heard of him.
    I did not know that a library keeps a blog that’s great. I too would have liiked to read the entire article, but certainly understand.
    Feel free to visit my blog – written from the persepctive of a person who stutters.

  9. columbialinguistics

    What a great resource! I am a member of the Linguistics Society at Columbia University, and I’ve added this site to our blogroll at columbialinguistics.wordpress.com. Thanks!

  10. Intimately, the article is really the sweetest on this deserving topic. I concur with your conclusions and will eagerly look forward to your incoming updates. Just saying thanks will not just be enough, for the extraordinary clarity in your writing. I will right away grab your rss feed to stay privy of any updates. Admirable work and much success in your business dealings!

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