Parental Perspectives Regarding Early Intervention and Its Role in Cochlear Implantation in Children

from Otology & Neurotology

Objective: To examine parental perspectives regarding services provided to families of hearing-impaired children under federally funded early-intervention (EI) programs with respect to support of cochlear implantation. Furthermore, to examine if family ethnicity or income was correlated with use of cochlear implants.

Study Design: A 4-page retrospective survey was mailed to parents of children who received Nucleus cochlear implants.

Setting: Surveys were sent to parents’ registered home addresses.

Patients: A random stratified sample of 300 parents residing in the United States was drawn from the registration database maintained by Cochlear Americas.

Intervention: Surveys were administered after the children received a cochlear implant.

Main Outcome Measures: Family ratings of perceived bias during advisement, services received under EI and difficulty accessing such services, and family’s socioeconomic status and ethnicity.

Results: Children who were non-Caucasian and of lower socioeconomic status were underrepresented in the cochlear implant population. Parents noted a lack of “comprehensive and bias-free” information regarding communication options and technology under EI and sometimes experienced difficulty in obtaining certain services.

Conclusion: Early-intervention professionals are the common denominator for families seeking information and services because they explain, help initiate, and expedite diagnostic and treatment services. Because low- and moderate-income families may have greater difficulty negotiating the cochlear implant process, EI can facilitate full access to this intervention by those with fewer financial resources.

Advertisements

About Callier Library

Housed at the internationally renowned Callier Center for Communication Disorders, Callier Library a branch facility of the McDermott Library at The University of Texas at Dallas.

Posted on January 29, 2008, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: