The Association Between Hearing Status and Psychosocial Health Before the Age of 70 Years: Results From an Internet-Based National Survey on Hearing.

Results: Adjusting for confounding variables, significant adverse associations between hearing status and distress, somatization, depression, and loneliness are found. For every decibel signal to noise ratio (dB SNR) reduction of hearing status, both the distress and somatization scores increased by 2% [distress: b = 0.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.00 to 0.03, p = 0.03; somatization: b = 0.02, 95% CI = 0.01 to 0.04, p < 0.001]. The odds for developing moderate or severe depression increase by 5% for every dB SNR reduction in hearing (odds ratio = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.00 to 1.09, p = 0.03). The odds for developing severe or very severe loneliness significantly increase by 7% for every dB SNR reduction in hearing (odds ratio = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.12, p = 0.004). Different age groups exhibit different associations between hearing status and psychosocial health, with loneliness being an issue particularly in the youngest age group (18 to 30 yr). In the group of middle-aged adults (40 to 50 yr), the number of significant associations is highest.

Conclusions: Hearing status is negatively associated with higher distress, depression, somatization, and loneliness in young and middle-aged adults. The associations are different in different age groups. The findings underline the need to seriously address the adverse effects of limited hearing among young and middle-aged adults both in future research and in clinical practice.

from Ear and Hearing

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Housed at the internationally renowned Callier Center for Communication Disorders, Callier Library a branch facility of the McDermott Library at The University of Texas at Dallas.

Posted on April 30, 2009, in Research. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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