Augmentative and alternative communication intervention in children with traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury

Children and youth who sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and/or spinal cord injury (SCI) may have temporary or permanent disabilities that affect their speech, language and communication abilities. Having a way to communicate can help reduce children’s confusion and anxiety, as well as enable them to participate more actively in the rehabilitation process and thus, recover from their injuries. In addition, effective communication with family, care staff, peers, teachers and friends is essential to long-term recovery and positive outcomes for children with TBI and SCI as they are integrated back into their communities. This article describes how rehabilitation teams can use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and assistive technologies (AT) to support the communication of children recovering from TBI and SCI over time.

<p><p>from the <a href=”Journal” _mce_href=”http://iospress.metapress.com/content/r356165877796720/”><em>Journal”>http://iospress.metapress.com/content/r356165877796720/”><em>Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine</em></a></p>

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About Callier Library

Housed at the internationally renowned Callier Center for Communication Disorders, Callier Library a branch facility of the McDermott Library at The University of Texas at Dallas.

Posted on February 21, 2011, in Research and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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