Race and the re-embodied voice in Hollywood film

As linguistic anthropologists and others have argued, the development of modern sound technologies led to the disembodiment of the voice; the resulting ideologies of voice, however, concerned embodiment rather than disembodiment. By contrast, in late-modern media regimes, essentialized voices have been recontextualized and linguistically re-embodied via crossing and stylization. This article demonstrates that the re-embodiment of voice reasserted naturalized boundaries of gender and race in Hollywood ‘wigger’ films from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s. The ideological effects of such representations both locally and more widely point to the importance of examining mediatized practices and products through a linguistic-anthropological lens.

from Language & Communication

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About Callier Library

Housed at the internationally renowned Callier Center for Communication Disorders, Callier Library a branch facility of the McDermott Library at The University of Texas at Dallas.

Posted on June 15, 2011, in Research and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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