Blog Archives

Communication Outcomes in Audiologic Reporting

This study highlights the need for audiologists to critically evaluate the effectiveness of their communication with other health-care providers and demonstrates the need for evidence-based approaches for interpreting audiologic information and reporting audiologic information to others.

from the Journal of the American Academy of Audiology

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Some Observations on the Nature of the Audiometric 4000 Hz Notch: Data from 3430 Veterans

Conclusions:

The data suggest that unilateral, 4000 Hz notched audiograms are as common or more common than bilateral notched audiograms and that unilateral notched audiograms are equally common for the LE and RE. The prevalence and characteristics of 4000 Hz notched audiograms in this veteran sample are similar to those observed in the population as a whole.

from the Journal of the American Academy of Audiology

Re-examining the relationship between audiometric profile and tinnitus pitch

Objective: We explored the relationship between audiogram shape and tinnitus pitch to answer questions arising from neurophysiological models of tinnitus: ‘Is the dominant tinnitus pitch associated with the edge of hearing loss?’ and ‘Is such a relationship more robust in people with narrow tinnitus bandwidth or steep sloping hearing loss?’ Design: A broken-stick fitting objectively quantified slope, degree and edge of hearing loss up to 16 kHz. Tinnitus pitch was characterized up to 12 kHz. We used correlation and multiple regression analyses for examining relationships with many potentially predictive audiometric variables. Study Sample: 67 people with chronic bilateral tinnitus (43 men and 24 women, aged from 22 to 81 years). Results: In this ample of 67 subjects correlation failed to reveal any relationship between the tinnitus pitch and the edge frequency. The tinnitus pitch generally fell within the area of hearing loss. The pitch of the tinnitus in a subset of subjects with a narrow tinnitus bandwidth (n = 23) was associated with the audiometric edge. Conclusions: Our findings concerning subjects with narrow tinnitus bandwidth suggest that this can be used as an a priori inclusion criterion. A large group of such subjects should be tested to confirm these results.

from the International Journal of Audiology

Hearing assessment in Menière’s disease†

In Menière’s disease, audiometry results corrected for patient age show an inherent upward-sloping configuration of the mean audiometric curve at all time points during the disease. The hearing pattern differs between unilateral and bilateral disease. The audiometric curve configuration may be an indicator of future bilateral disease. Laryngoscope, 2011

from The Laryngoscope

The relationship between tinnitus pitch and the audiogram

Abstract
We studied the relationship between tinnitus pitch and the audiogram in 195 patients. Patients with tone-like tinnitus reported a higher pitch (mean = 5385 Hz) compared to those with a noise-like quality (mean = 3266 Hz). Those with a flat audiogram were more likely to report: a noise-like tinnitus, a unilateral tinnitus, and have a pitch < 2000 Hz. The average duration of bilateral tinnitus (12 years) was longer than that of unilateral tinnitus (5 years). Older subjects reported a less severe tinnitus handicap questionnaire score. Patients with a notched audiogram often reported a pitch ≤8000 Hz. Subjects with normal hearing up to 8000 Hz tended to have a pitch ≥8000 Hz. We failed to find a relationship between the pitch and the edge of a high frequency hearing loss. Some individuals did exhibit a pitch at the low frequency edge of a hearing loss, but we could find no similar characteristics among these subjects. It is possible that a relationship between pitch and audiogram is present only in certain subgroups.

from the International Journal of Audiology

The relationship between tinnitus pitch and the audiogram

We studied the relationship between tinnitus pitch and the audiogram in 195 patients. Patients with tone-like tinnitus reported a higher pitch (mean = 5385 Hz) compared to those with a noise-like quality (mean = 3266 Hz). Those with a flat audiogram were more likely to report: a noise-like tinnitus, a unilateral tinnitus, and have a pitch < 2000 Hz. The average duration of bilateral tinnitus (12 years) was longer than that of unilateral tinnitus (5 years). Older subjects reported a less severe tinnitus handicap questionnaire score. Patients with a notched audiogram often reported a pitch ≤8000 Hz. Subjects with normal hearing up to 8000 Hz tended to have a pitch ≥8000 Hz. We failed to find a relationship between the pitch and the edge of a high frequency hearing loss. Some individuals did exhibit a pitch at the low frequency edge of a hearing loss, but we could find no similar characteristics among these subjects. It is possible that a relationship between pitch and audiogram is present only in certain subgroups.

from the International Journal of Audiology

The relationship between tinnitus pitch and the audiogram

We studied the relationship between tinnitus pitch and the audiogram in 195 patients. Patients with tone-like tinnitus reported a higher pitch (mean = 5385 Hz) compared to those with a noise-like quality (mean = 3266 Hz). Those with a flat audiogram were more likely to report: a noise-like tinnitus, a unilateral tinnitus, and have a pitch < 2000 Hz. The average duration of bilateral tinnitus (12 years) was longer than that of unilateral tinnitus (5 years). Older subjects reported a less severe tinnitus handicap questionnaire score. Patients with a notched audiogram often reported a pitch ≤8000 Hz. Subjects with normal hearing up to 8000 Hz tended to have a pitch ≥8000 Hz. We failed to find a relationship between the pitch and the edge of a high frequency hearing loss. Some individuals did exhibit a pitch at the low frequency edge of a hearing loss, but we could find no similar characteristics among these subjects. It is possible that a relationship between pitch and audiogram is present only in certain subgroups.

from the International Journal of Audiology