Blog Archives

An evaluation of preservation of residual hearing using the suprameatal approach for cochlear implantation

Conclusions:
The results of this study demonstrate that complete preservation of residual hearing is possible in a limited number of patients using the suprameatal approach technique for cochlear implantation. For a reliable analysis of the audiometric effects of cochlear implant surgery, it is important to take into account the ceiling effects, therefore using different calculation methods to estimate the accurate deterioration of hearing thresholds.

from The Laryngoscope

Intraoperative electrically evoked stapedius reflex thresholds in children undergone cochlear implantation: Round window and cochleostomy approaches

Conclusion
The duration of electrically stimulation thresholds were shorter in RW group. ESRT measurements were recorded at lower threshold in the RW group compared with the Promontory group. RW insertion offers best electrically stimulation relative to electrode insertion via a promontory cochleostomy.

from the International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

Pitfalls in the management of monaural deafness

Conclusion: Cochlear implantation in patients with long-term deafness should be considered carefully, even if deafness is monaural.

from the Journal of Laryngology and Otology

Prevalence of GJB2-associated deafness and outcomes of cochlear implantation in Iran

Conclusion: Children with GJB2-related deafness benefit from cochlear implantation to the same extent as those with non-GJB2-related deafness.

from the Journal of Laryngology and Otology

The bony cochlear nerve canal in children with absent or hypoplastic cochlear nerves

BCNC is an additional parameter to assess presence of the cochlear branch of the CN. Presence of the BCNC may indicate cochlear nerve presence. Caution should be used in assessing candidacy of cochlear implants based on MRI alone and a combination of imaging and audiological tests should be used to assess presence of the CN.

from the International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

The effect of cochlear implantation and post-operative rehabilitation on acoustic voice analysis in post-lingual hearing impaired adults

Post-lingual deaf adults can develop some vocal abnormalities similar to those developed in pre-lingual deaf individuals. The aim of this work was to study the effect of cochlear implantation followed by post-operative rehabilitation on voice acoustics in post-lingual hearing impaired adults with different durations of hearing loss. The study included 35 post-lingual hearing impaired adults who underwent cochlear implantation. Patients were divided into two groups according to the duration of their hearing loss. Each group was further divided into two subgroups according to whether they received auditory rehabilitation or not. Using the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program (MDVP) parameters, comparisons were made between each subgroup of patients and the normal MDVP Saudi database, and between subgroups of patients. Most of the patients in the two groups reported significant improvement in their MDVP results post-implantation. Further, significantly deviant MDVP parameters were reported in the group of patients with longer duration of hearing loss. Patients who received rehabilitation significantly improved more than those who did not. In conclusion, it appears that cochlear implantation improves the auditory control of voice production in post-lingual deaf adults. Also, it is obvious that cochlear implantation at an early stage of hearing loss gives better results on voice control, especially if augmented with auditory rehabilitation.<p><p>from the <a href=”European” _mce_href=”http://springerlink.com/content/dh7656782584u157/”><em>European”>http://springerlink.com/content/dh7656782584u157/”><em>European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology</em></a></p>

Cochlear Implantation in Brown–Vialetto–Van-Laere syndrome

These poor clinical outcomes appear to be related to retrocochlear and probable central auditory pathway degeneration.

from the Journal of Laryngology and Otology

Measuring communicative performance with the FAPCI instrument: Preliminary results from normal hearing and cochlear implanted children

Conclusion
: Normal hearing children demonstrated increasing FAPCI scores with age, and these preliminary growth curves allow for the interpretation of a cochlear-implanted child’s FAPCI scores in comparison to normal hearing children. Additional research using a larger, longitudinal cohort of normal hearing children will be needed to develop definitive normative FAPCI trajectories.

from the International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

Prevalence of GJB2 causing recessive profound non-syndromic deafness in Japanese children

Conclusion
Our results suggest that the frequencies of mutations in GJB2 and GJB6 deletions differ among cohorts. Thus, our report is an important study of GJB2 in Japanese children with profound non-syndromic deafness.

from the International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

Genetic predisposition and sensory experience in language development: Evidence from cochlear-implanted children

Recent neurobiological studies have advanced the hypothesis that language development is not continuously plastic but is governed by biological constraints that may be modified by experience within a particular time window. This hypothesis is tested based on spontaneous speech data from deaf cochlear-implanted (CI) children with access to linguistic stimuli at different developmental times. Language samples of nine children who received a CI between 5 and 19 months are analysed for linguistic measures representing different stages of language development. These include canonical babbling ratios, vocabulary diversity, and functional elements such as determiners. The results show that language development is positively related to the age at which children get first access to linguistic input and that later access to language is associated with a slower-than-normal language-learning rate. As such, the positive effect of early experience on the functional organisation of the brain in language processes is confirmed by behavioural performance.

from Language and Cognitive Processes

Cochlear implantation in patients with autoimmune inner ear disease including cogan syndrome: A comparison with age- and sex-matched controls

Conclusions:
To our knowledge this was the largest study of cochlear implantation in AIED and Cogan syndrome patients. In our experience, both groups generally attained high levels of post-CI speech perception and performed above average. Cochlear ossification affecting implantation in Cogan syndrome patients was not observed in our series, contrary to some reports.

from The Laryngoscope

Cochlear implantation in common forms of genetic deafness

Genetic factors are among the main etiologies of severe to profound hearing loss and may play an important role in cochlear implantation (CI) outcomes. While genes for common forms of deafness have been cloned, efforts to correlate the functional outcome of CIs with a genetic form of deafness carried by the patient have been largely anecdotal to date. It has been suggested that the differences in auditory performance may be explained by differences in the number of surviving spiral ganglion cells, etiology of hearing loss, and other factors. Knowledge of the specific loci and mutations involved in patients who receive cochlear implants may elucidate other factors related to CI performance. In this review article, current knowledge of cochlear implants for hereditary hearing loss will be discussed with an emphasis on relevant clinical genotype–phenotype correlations.

from the International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

Cochlear implantation in children with enlarged vestibular aqueduct

Children with EVA undergoing cochlear implantation are at greater risk for CSF gushers, but they do well audiometrically and functionally. Laryngoscope, 2010

from The Laryngoscope

Cochlear implantation in a patient with atypical Cogan’s syndrome complicated with hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis

A 55-year-old woman had bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), vertigo, uveitis, and aortitis associated with Cogan’s syndrome (CS). She had a history of listeria meningitis and hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis (HCP), both of which were considered to be related to SNHL progression. She developed bilateral profound deafness within 1 year, despite medical treatment with corticosteroids and methotrexate (MTX). She underwent cochlear implantation (CI) of the left ear. Although the left and right basal turns of the cochleae were ossified, all electrodes were successfully inserted, and subsequently the inferior segment of the basal turn was drilled out. The patient did not have any postoperative complications and showed good speech perception.

from Auris Nasus Larynx

Cochlear implantation in pontine tegmental cap dysplasia

Pontine tegmental cap dysplasia (PTCD) is an exceptionally rare brain stem and cerebellar malformation characterized by ventral pontine hypoplasia, vaulted pontine tegmentum, hypoplasia of the vermis, subtotal absence of middle cerebellar peduncles, lateralized course of the superior cerebellar peduncles, and absence or alteration of the inferior olivary nucleus. The main clinical features are multiple cranial neurophaties and ataxia. Sensorineural hearing loss of varying severity is almost always present. To date, 14 cases of PTCD have been reported in the literature. We present a child with PTCD and profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss who underwent cochlear implantation. To the best of our knowledge, cochlear implantation in PTCD has not been previously reported. Functional outcome was assessed using the Speech Perception Categories and the Speech Intelligibility Rating scale. At 22 months’ postoperative evaluation, the patient who was placed into speech perception category 0 (no detection of speech) preoperatively progressed to category 3 (beginning word identification). Before implantation, the child had connected speech unintelligible. At the last follow-up, she had connected speech intelligible to a listener who has little experience of a deaf person’s speech. Cochlear implantation allowed this child to improve her quality of life, increasing her self-confidence, independence, and social integration.

from the International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology