Blog Archives

Augmentation of Vocal Fold Using a Fat Block Implant Following Cordotomy Through a Minithyrotomy Approach in a Rabbit Model

Conclusions
Minithyrotomy vocal fold augmentation using an autologous fat block may soon be feasible in humans undergoing rehabilitation for postcordotomy dysphonia without causing additional damage to the vocal folds.

from the Journal of Voice

A New Hypothesis for Fluidification of Vocal-Fold Mucus: Scintigraphic Study

Conclusion
The results indicate that an increased volume of saliva enters the larynx and is adsorbed in its mucosa, producing mucus fluidification. This supports our alternative hypothesis to the unlikely concept that hydration by water ingestion is the factor responsible for reduction of the mucus viscosity of the vocal folds.

from the Journal of Voice

Consequences of Chronic Nasal Obstruction on the Laryngeal Mucosa and Voice Quality of 4- to 12-Year-Old Children

Conclusions
Relevant changes in perceptual auditory and acoustic vocal analyses and in the videolaryngoscopy were detected in children with nasal obstruction. These results showed the importance of the assessment of nasal obstruction in dysphonic children.

from the Journal of Voice

Vocal health profile of amateur singers from an evangelical church

CONCLUSION: Amateur religious singers of both genders showed an expressive percentage of vocal complaints and habits that might be associated to lack of information about healthy vocal habits, which can contribute to the development of laryngeal alterations and voice disorders.

from Revista de Sociedade Brasileira de Fonoaudiologia

Validation of the Lithuanian Version of the Glottal Function Index

Conclusion
The GFI-LT is considered to be a valid and reliable tool for self-assessment of the severity of voice disorders in Lithuanian-speaking patients.

from the Journal of Voice

Readability of Patient-Reported Outcome Questionnaires for Use With Persons With Dysphonia

In the demand for standardization of voice-related quality of life assessment tools, developers should consider readability as another testable construct because poor readability may affect validity, reliability and sensitivity. The voice clinician should consider the average reading level needed to understand a particular PRO questionnaire when administering it to a patient or their proxy. Developers of PRO questionnaires should consider reading level of respondents and include information about this when reporting psychometric data.

from the Journal of Voice

Coping Strategies in Voice Disorders of a Brazilian Population

The purpose of this research is to explore coping strategies of individuals with and without vocal complaint and to examine relationships between the type of coping and vocal complaint; vocal symptoms; vocal self-assessment; perceptual analysis and states of depression, anxiety, and aspects related to self-esteem; and locus of control. One hundred seventy-eight subjects with (n = 87) and without vocal (n = 91) complaint completed the following analysis: identification and characterization questionnaire, vocal self-assessment, perceptual analysis, Voice Disability Coping Questionnaire (VDCQ)—Brazilian Version, Beck Depression Inventory, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Health Locus of Control Scale. Age (P = 0.219) and sex (P = 0.132) were similar for both groups. The groups were statistically different for the following vocal characterization: number of symptoms, voice complaint, vocal self-assessment, and perceptual analysis. Conversely, the groups did not differ on states of depression, anxiety, and aspects related to self-esteem; and locus of control. Mean coping scores for the group with vocal complaint was 51.86 and for the group without vocal complaint was 23.18. Furthermore, men and women did not differ on the coping strategies reported (P = 0.750); however, individuals with vocal complaint reported statistically more strategies than the individuals without vocal complaint (P < 0.001). Problem-focused strategies were more frequently reported by individuals with vocal complaint (46.7%). Coping results correlated (Spearman’s r) positively with vocal perceptual analysis (P = 0.036), depression (P = 0.006), and anxiety (P = 0.022), and correlated negatively with locus of control (P = 0.001). No correlation was found between coping and the other variables studied. These findings indicate that people with vocal complaint use a variety of coping strategies, problem focused in particular, to deal with their voice problems. Coping results appear to be associated with perceptual characteristics of voice and some traits, such as depression, anxiety, and locus of control.

from the Journal of Voice

Voice Disorders in the Elderly

Our studies identified at least one pathologic factor contributing to dysphonia in all elderly patients presenting with voice complaints. The high average VHI score indicated that these geriatric patients experienced significant dissatisfaction because of their dysphonia. The problem was of sufficient magnitude to result in a high percentage of patients proceeding with treatment. Additional research is needed to determine normative values for OVMs and other assessments in the elderly population and establish whether normative values in common use are appropriate for this population.

from the Journal of Voice

The Prevalence of Dysphonia, Its Association With Immunomediated Diseases And Correlation With Biochemical Markers

Conclusions
Systemic immunomediated diseases may associate voice disorders. Patients with SLE are those who develop these disorders more frequently. The biochemical parameters most affected during a crisis are VSG and anti-DNA antibodies.

from the Journal of Voice

Mucosal Bridge of the Vocal Fold: Difficulties in the Diagnosis and Treatment

Mucosal bridges are rare laryngeal lesions probably of genetic origin. They may cause dysphonia of varying degrees, especially when associated with other laryngeal lesions such as vocal sulci and cysts. Reports on mucosal bridges are rare, and the better treatment is inconclusive.

from the Journal of Voice

MRI Anatomical and Morphological Differences in the Vocal Tract Between Dysphonic and Normal Adult Women

Results obtained from this study suggest that patients with VN may present a constantly increased tension of the laryngeal muscles, even at rest; moreover, reduced anterior-posterior dimension of the larynx may be a morphological characteristic of patients with VN.

from the Journal of Voice

Voice-related quality of life: the impact of a dysphonia according to gender, age and occupational use of voice

CONCLUSION: The self-reported impact of a vocal disorder in the quality of life was similarly noticed by men and women. The subjects aged between 20 and 29 years had different perceptions regarding the impact of dysphonia in their quality of life when compared to individuals of the other age ranges. Vocal disorders caused less impact on the quality of life of elite vocal performers.

from Revista de Sociedade Brasileira de Fonoaudiologia

Preliminary results of a computer-assisted vocal load test with 10-min test duration

Nowadays, many occupations require a high vocal loading capacity. Therefore, it becomes increasingly important to have suitable test procedures for the vocal load, which can be executed with a low personnel and temporal expenditure. Patients with decreased vocal loading capacity were distinguished from test persons free of voice complaints with a 15-min test. It should be examined whether the test duration can be further shortened by an increase in the demanded vocal intensity. Sixty two persons underwent a vocal load test (VLT) of 10 min: in each case, 1 min in the volumes 75 dB(A) and 80 dB(A). Volume and fundamental frequency were measured real time. Before and directly after vocal load, as well as after a 30-min voice rest, the Goettingen hoarseness diagram was executed for the objective judgment of vocal quality. Besides, every person assessed himself on the bases of the Voice Handicap Index (VHI 12) and a questionnaire on the subjective state before the examination and after the VLT. The test could be mastered by all participants, patients and test persons, and was evaluated by all as tiring. However, we could not distinguish persons who indicated a decreased vocal maximum stress in everyday life from persons without vocal complaints using the shorter test with higher load, which was possible in the 15-min test pattern. A shortening of the test duration to 10 min for an examination of the vocal loading capacity is not possible, in spite of raised vocal load. It was proved in this study that a reliable distinction between patients and test persons was not possible using the 10-min vocal load test. A reliable statement concerning the permanent capacity of the voice cannot be made. Further scientific investigation in the important field of vocal load diagnostics is required.

from the European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology

Voice Disorders in Primary School Teachers and Barriers to Care

There are multiple barriers to care for the dysphonic teacher, including the lack of awareness of the availability of professional help. Further studies should evaluate teacher education and reducing barriers to care.

from the Journal of Voice

Spectral- and Cepstral-Based Measures During Continuous Speech: Capacity to Distinguish Dysphonia and Consistency Within a Speaker

Spectral- and cepstral-based acoustic measures are preferable to time-based measures for accurately representing dysphonic voices during continuous speech. Although these measures show promising relationships to perceptual voice quality ratings, less is known regarding their ability to differentiate normal from dysphonic voice during continuous speech and the consistency of these measures across multiple utterances by the same speaker. The purpose of this study was to determine whether spectral moments of the long-term average spectrum (LTAS) (spectral mean, standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis) and cepstral peak prominence measures were significantly different for speakers with and without voice disorders when assessed during continuous speech. The consistency of these measures within a speaker across utterances was also addressed. Continuous speech samples from 27 subjects without voice disorders and 27 subjects with mixed voice disorders were acoustically analyzed. In addition, voice samples were perceptually rated for overall severity. Acoustic analyses were performed on three continuous speech stimuli from a reading passage: two full sentences and one constituent phrase. Significant between-group differences were found for both cepstral measures and three LTAS measures (P < 0.001): spectral mean, skewness, and kurtosis. These five measures also showed moderate to strong correlations to overall voice severity. Furthermore, high degrees of within-speaker consistency (correlation coefficients ≥0.89) across utterances with varying length and phonemic content were evidenced for both subject groups.

from the Journal of Voice