Blog Archives

How Well Do Children Who Are Internationally Adopted Acquire Language? A Meta-Analysis

Conclusions: The results of the meta-analysis have direct clinical application regarding the assessment and treatment of language skills of internationally adopted children. The study also has implications for future studies of the language development of internationally adopted children.

from the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research

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Narrative Skills in Swedish Children with Language Impairment

This study investigated the development of narrative skills in Swedish children with language impairment between age 5 and age 10. Seventeen children with LI and two control groups of age peers with typical development participated in a picture elicited story telling task. Analyses included measures of story content, cohesion and grammar. Our subjects showed development in different areas from age 5 to 10, but they did not perform at the level of the controls at age 10 on number of different verbs used and percent grammatically correct C-units. We conclude that preschool children with LI develop in their narrative skills over time, but not to the level of their age-peers at age 10.

from the Journal of Communication Disorders

Impaired language performance as a precursor or consequence of Rolandic epilepsy?

Language is impaired in children with Rolandic epilepsy. In some children this impairment of language may even be a precursor, for the Rolandic epilepsy. It is undecided however, whether the language impairment develops gradually after the onset of epilepsy, whether Rolandic epilepsy and language impairment are both symptoms of an underlying syndrome or both develop during the process of epileptogenesis as we observed in some children the onset of language impairment before the onset of epilepsy.

from the Journal of the Neurological sciences

Feasibility, Efficacy, and Social Validity of Home-Based Storybook Reading Intervention for Children With Language Impairment

Conclusion: Study results raise questions about the feasibility of home-based intervention for some families; future research that examines the characteristics of families that may affect completion are needed. The causal effects of print-focused reading sessions are promising for addressing children’s print-concept knowledge but not alphabet knowledge. Home-based reading intervention has considerable social validity as a therapeutic approach.

from the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research

Assessment and Treatment of Working Memory Deficits in School-Age Children: The Role of the Speech-Language Pathologist

Conclusion: Research to date has documented that children with language impairments frequently have poor WM skills. SLPs can support poor WM skills by considering both modifications to the environment and child-enacted knowledge and skills, which may serve to reduce the impact of poor WM skills on learning and academic success.

from Language, Speech and Hearing Services in Schools

Impaired language performance as a precursor or consequence of Rolandic epilepsy?

Language is impaired in children with Rolandic epilepsy. In some children this impairment of language may even be a precursor, for the Rolandic epilepsy. It is undecided however, whether the language impairment develops gradually after the onset of epilepsy, whether Rolandic epilepsy and language impairment are both symptoms of an underlying syndrome or both develop during the process of epileptogenesis as we observed in some children the onset of language impairment before the onset of epilepsy.

from Neurological Sciences

The Relationship between Peer Conflict Resolution Knowledge and Peer Victimization in School-Age Children across the Language Continuum

Peer victimization, or bullying, has been identified as a significant child health priority and children with language impairment (LI) are among those who are vulnerable. Given the mandate of educators to provide support for all students who are bullied regardless of language status, research is needed that integrates the study of risk factors for peer victimization among children who are developing typically and children who have LI. Accordingly, this preliminary study explored the degree to which one potential risk factor, peer conflict resolution knowledge, was related to peer victimization in children across the language continuum, and considered whether or not individual differences in language ability influenced that relationship. Participants included 17 girls and 15 boys aged 9-12 years with a wide range of language abilities, six meeting criteria for LI. Participants completed a hypothetical peer conflict resolution task and a measure of peer victimization. Correlational analyses revealed very different patterns of relationships for boys and girls. Whereas boys’ reports of peer victimization were meaningfully related to how they responded to hypothetical peer conflicts, girls’ reports were most strongly associated with language ability. These preliminary findings suggest that it is important to consider gender when conceptualizing how factors such as peer conflict resolution knowledge might influence children’s risk of being bullied.

from the Journal of Communication Disorders

Maturation of auditory evoked potentials from 6 to 48 months: Prediction to 3 and 4 year language and cognitive abilities

Conclusions
The development of LLAEP in FH+ children is modulated by differences in the rate of maturation as well as variations in temporal processing abilities.

from Clinical Neurophysiology

Innovations in Measuring Peer Conflict Resolution Knowledge in Children with LI: Exploring the Accessibility of a Visual Analogue Rating Scale

This preliminary study explored peer conflict resolution knowledge in children with and without language impairment (LI). Specifically, it evaluated the utility of a visual analogue scale (VAS) for measuring nuances in such knowledge. Children aged 9-12 years, 26 with typically developing language (TLD) and 6 with LI, completed a training protocol and hypothetical task in which they rated goals and strategies that could be pursued following peer conflict. Whereas participants with TLD provided graded judgments using the entire VAS, most children with LI relied solely on the scale anchors. These results suggest at least two possibilities. The less differentiated manner in which participants with LI utilized the VAS may have been influenced by how they viewed the peer conflict situations. Alternatively, additional training may be required to enable them to consistently use the whole scale. Further research is needed to establish whether ratings made by children with LI reflect differences in social perceptions or a need for further experience with the VAS. In either case, distinguishing between these alternatives will likely provide a better understanding of factors that impact the peer relationships of children with LI.

from the Journal of Communication Disorders

Aspects on quality of life of subjects with developmental language disorders

This article is a brief overview on quality of life aspects in subjects with developmental language disorders. After the introduction, some results of personal studies on health related quality of life are summarized, followed by a more general discussion on the topic. To summarize, taking the self-perceptions of individuals with language disorders as part of clinical practice could improve the recognition of subjects with the greatest risk of diminished well-being subsequently.

from Audiological Medicine

Who Does What to Whom: Introduction of Referents in Children’s Storytelling From Pictures

Conclusion: These results suggest that the FM measure is a useful tool for identifying whether a child has a problem with introducing referents in stories.

from Language, Speech and Hearing Services in Schools

The Effects of Literate Narrative Intervention on Children With Neurologically Based Language Impairments: An Early Stage Study

Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that literate narrative intervention may be useful for improving children’s functional use of narrative macrostructure and microstructure, including literate language.

from the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research

Mothers’ Autobiographical Memory and Book Narratives with, Children with Specific Language Impairment

This study examined the role that mothers’ scaffolding plays in the autobiographical memory (AM) and storybook narratives of children with specific language impairment (SLI). Seven 4- to 5-year-old children and their mothers co-constructed narratives in both contexts. We also compared children’s narratives with mothers to their narratives with an experimenter. Narratives were assessed in terms of narrative style (i.e., elaborativeness) and topic control. Mothers’ elaborative and repetitive questions during AM and book narratives were related to children’s elaborations, whereas mothers’ elaborative and repetitive statements were not. Mothers produced more topic-controlling utterances than children in both contexts; however, both mothers and children provided proportionally more information in the book context. Additionally, children were more elaborative with mothers compared to an experimenter.

from the Journal of Communication Disorders

Towards evidence-based practice in language intervention for bilingual children

Evidence Based Practice requires that clinical decisions be based on evidence from rigorously controlled research studies. At this time, very few studies have directly examined the efficacy of clinical intervention methods for bilingual children. Clinical decisions for this population cannot, therefore, be based on the strongest forms of research evidence, but must be inferred from other sources. This article reviews the available intervention research on bilingual children, the current clinical recommendations for this population, and the strength of the empirical and theoretical support on which these recommendations are based. Finally, future directions are suggested for documenting current methods of intervention and developing optimal methods for different groups of bilingual children. Although the current research base is limited, the few studies available to date uniformly suggest that interventions that include a focus on both languages are superior to those that focus on only one language. The available research offers little guidance, however, as to the particular treatment methods that may be most appropriate. Further research is required to examine efficacy with larger numbers of children and children of various bilingual backgrounds. It is suggested that efforts to develop and test intervention methods for bilingual children must carefully consider the linguistic heterogeneity of bilingual children and the cultural variation in communication styles, child rearing practices, and child rearing beliefs. This will lead to the development of methods that may involve treatment methods that are more suitable for other languages and cultures.

from the Journal of Communication Disorders

Word Learning in Children With Primary Language Impairment: A Meta-Analysis

Conclusion: The difference in novel word learning performance between children with LI and age-matched children is strongly affected by task and participant characteristics in the primary studies.

from the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research