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The effectiveness of Korean number naming on insight into numbers in Dutch students with mild intellectual disabilities

The Korean method of number naming seems to be a promising way to teach students with mild intellectual disabilities insight into numbers.

from Research in Developmental Disabilities

The effectiveness of Korean number naming on insight into numbers in Dutch students with mild intellectual disabilities

Children from Asian countries score higher on early years’ arithmetic tests than children from Europe or the United States of America. An explanation for these differences may be the way numbers are named. A clear ten-structure like in the Korean language method leads to a better insight into numbers and arithmetic skills. This assumption forms the basis of the current study. Examined is whether an intervention with number naming in the Korean way influences number awareness of students with mild intellectual disabilities (N = 70; mean age: 9.0 years). The results indicate a positive effect of this alternative method of number naming on the insight into numbers up to 20. However, the effect did not generalize to insight into numbers 21–100. The Korean method of number naming seems to be a promising way to teach students with mild intellectual disabilities insight into numbers.

from Research in Developmental Disabilities

The relationship between phonological processing skills and word and nonword identification performance in children with mild intellectual disabilities

Word and nonword identification skills were examined in a sample of 80 elementary school age students with mild intellectual disabilities and mixed etiologies who were described as struggling to learn to read by their teachers. Performance on measures of receptive and expressive vocabulary, measures of phonological awareness, and measures of word and nonword identification were included for analyses. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that, after controlling for chronological age and vocabulary knowledge, phonological processing accounted for a large and significant amount of unique variance of both word and nonword identification. In addition, the pattern of results found in this study is similar to that obtained with typically developing learners. As with typically developing children, measures of phonological awareness were significantly correlated with measures of both reading achievement and vocabulary knowledge.

<p><p>from <a href=”http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6VDN-511KB2N-1&_user=108452&_coverDate=09%2F16%2F2010&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_origin=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_acct=C000059732&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=108452&md5=ae668173efea1364cba27bb3b1914291&searchtype=a”><em>Research in Developmental Disabilities</em></a></p>