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Speech-language pathologists’ views on attrition from the profession

The aim of this study was to identify common themes in speech-language pathologists’ perceptions of factors that increase and decrease their experiences of job stress, their satisfaction with their jobs and the profession, and their opinions about why people chose to leave the speech-language pathology profession. The participants’ perceptions about the relationships between job stress, work satisfaction and job and profession retention were also explored. Sixty members of Speech Pathology Australia from a range of geographical and professional contexts were asked to participate in telephone interviews. Eighteen speech-language pathologists agreed to participate (30% response rate), and took part in semi-structured telephone interviews. Two researchers independently coded transcripts of the interviews for themes. Eight major themes were identified. These were positive aspects of the profession, workload, non-work obligations, effectiveness, recognition, support, learning and autonomy. The themes that emerged from analysis of these interviews provide new evidence about the positive and negative aspects of working as a speech-language pathologist, and provide preliminary insights into potential reasons as to why speech-language pathologists choose to remain in or leave the profession.

from the International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology

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Audiology education and practice from an international perspective

from the International Journal of Audiology

This paper describes the international education and practice of audiology with the broader aim of proposing possible cost-effective and sustainable education models to address the current situation. Major audiology organizations worldwide were surveyed from February 2005 to May 2007, and organizations from 62 countries (78% of the world population) returned a completed survey. Overall, the results suggested a wide range of professionals providing hearing health care, and 86% of the respondents reported a need for more audiologists. There was also considerable variation in the scope of practice among the different hearing health care professionals, and the minimum education levels of audiologists with similar scopes of practice. The countries surveyed fell into four broad categories in terms of professional resources, and the results highlighted the urgent need for forward planning at both national and international levels. The study highlights options for addressing some of the challenges in educating audiologists and the provision of hearing health care services globally.