Blog Archives

The effect of saccular function on static balance ability of profound hearing-impaired children

There was a close relation between the presence of VEMP and ASNR. Additionally, when ASNR was present, the recording of VEMP could be expected. Successful performance in the static balance exercises with reduced vestibular and somatosensory inputs increased the possibility of the recording of ASNR and VEMP.

from the International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

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Age-Related Changes in Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials Using a Modified Blood Pressure Manometer Feedback Method

Conclusions: This study confirmed a significant decline in VEMP amplitude and increase in VEMP thresholds in healthy older persons. Normative age-related data may be necessary to properly interpret VEMP recordings in a clinical setting when evaluating aging populations. The BPM method utilized for controlling SCM muscle may be a valuable alternative to control SCM muscle contraction when electromyography equipment is not available.

from the American Journal of Audiology

Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials: review

Conclusion: The benefits of vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing have already been established as regards the diagnosis and monitoring of several clinical conditions. Researchers continue to delve deeper into potential new clinical applications, with early results suggesting promising future developments.

from the Journal of Laryngology and Otology

Acoustically evoked, short latency negative response in children with sensorineural hearing loss

Conclusion: The presence of an acoustically evoked, short latency negative response is dependent not on residual hearing but on normal saccular function. This response can be measured in patients who cannot contract their neck muscles

from the Journal of Laryngology and Otology

Ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMPs) require extraocular muscles but not facial or cochlear nerve activity

Conclusions
The results suggested that short-latency, initially negative evoked potentials recorded below the eyes are not affected by cochlear or facial nerve activities and are dependent on the presence of extraocular muscles.

Significance
This study provides the evidence that oVEMPs originate from exraocular muscles activated through the vestibulo-ocular pathway.

from Clinical Neuropsychology

The vestibular evoked myogenic potential: A test–retest reliability study

Conclusions
A unilateral muscle contraction controlled by a feedback mechanism resulted in reliable response parameters, comparable right to left and corresponding to literature data obtained in different test conditions.

Significance
The use of a blood pressure manometer as feedback mechanism combined with a meticulously controlled positioning of the head and contraction of the SCM muscle provides a reliable alternative in clinical settings, when the background muscle contraction cannot be measured or software related correction algorithms are not accessible.

from Clinical Neurophysiology

Ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMPs) require extraocular muscles but not facial or cochlear nerve activity

Conclusions
The results suggested that short-latency, initially negative evoked potentials recorded below the eyes are not affected by cochlear or facial nerve activities and are dependent on the presence of extraocular muscles.

from Clinical Neurophysiology