Blog Archives

Guiding Principles and Clinical Applications for Speech-Language Pathology Practice in Early Intervention

Conclusion: It is critical that families of infants and toddlers who are at risk for, or who have been diagnosed with, communication disorders receive all necessary services and supports. EI services should be tailored to the individual and the changing needs, preferences, and priorities of each family. The earlier services are provided, the more likely is the child’s chance to develop effective communication.

from Language, Speech and Hearing Services in Schools

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Health Sciences Descriptors in the Brazilian Speech-Language and Hearing Science*

the presented proposal of a thesaurus contains the specific terminology of the Brazilian Speech-Language and Hearing Sciences and reflects the descriptors of the published scientific production. Being the DeCS a trilingual vocabulary (Portuguese, English and Spanish), the present descriptors organization proposition can be used in these three languages, allowing greater cultural interchange between different nations.

from Pró-Fono Revista de Atualização Científica

Oral narratives of children with typical language development*

children presented longer narratives in the book context. However, no significant differences were observed between the age groups. The results of the study also suggest that the interlocutor’s interventions become less necessary with the aging process.

from Pró-Fono Revista de Atualização Científica

An introduction to the speechBITE database: Speech pathology database for best interventions and treatment efficacy

This paper describes the development of the Speech Pathology Database for Best Interventions and Treatment Efficacy (speechBITE) at The University of Sydney. The speechBITE database is designed to provide better access to the intervention research relevant to speech pathology and to help clinicians interpret treatment research. The challenges speech pathologists face when locating research to support evidence-based practice have been well documented and include inadequate time resources and difficulties in navigating and using a multiplicity of electronic databases. These barriers are addressed by speechBITE by providing the first open-access database on the internet that solely indexes treatment in the area of communication and swallowing disorders. The database includes the bibliographic details from systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, nonrandomized controlled trials, case series, and single-case experimental design studies. At present, randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials are rated with the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale to assist clinicians with interpreting the methodological quality of the clinical studies of relevance to speech pathologists.

from Evidence-Based Communication Assessment and Intervention

Overt use of a tactile/kinaesthetic strategy shifts to covert processing in rehabilitation of letter-by-letter reading

Conclusions: This study replicates previous findings on the efficacy of tactile/kinaesthetic treatment for letter-by-letter readers with poor letter naming. It further demonstrates that this treatment can alter cognitive processing such that words never specifically trained can be read in free vision without overtly using the trained strategy. The data suggest that an important element in achieving this level of generalisation is continuing training beyond the point of initial mastery (i.e., accurate letter naming).

from Aphasiology

Speech-language pathology profile of the Dendê community: perspectives for future actions

CONCLUSION: It was verified that most prevalent Speech-Language Pathology alterations were related to the presence of oral habits, followed by oral and written language aspects. Nevertheless, a low level of hearing and voice complaints were reported. A situational diagnosis helps redirecting the activities practiced in the community, aiming its population. This is achieved through educational initiatives of health prevention and promotion, which should lead to better, quicker and more efficient results.

from Revista de Sociedade Brasileira de Fonoaudiologia

The use of the compensatory lengthening strategy in different severities of phonological disorder

CONCLUSION: There was no relationship between the use of the compensatory lengthening strategy and the different phonological disorder severities. Subjects’ distribution based on the severity of the phonological disorder, according to the classifications used in the study, allowed the visualization of a correspondence between both classifications of the disorder.

from Revista de Sociedade Brasileira de Fonoaudiologia

Speech pathologists and audiologists with Ph.D. in Brazil: profile from 1976 to 2008*

there was a significant increase of speech pathologists and audiologists with Ph. D., which enables major insertion of these professionals in research activities and qualified scientific production.

from Pró-Fono Revista de Atualização Científica

Building speech-language pathologist capacity for evidence-based practice: A unique graduate course approach

A speech-language pathology graduate-level course using the systematic review and meta-analytic process as a learning tool is described. The course design, content, activities, and pedagogical methods are discussed in depth. Three groups of students worked collaboratively to produce three systematic reviews in the area of language and literacy. This course provided a framework for the completion of the reviews and the development of the students as expert consumers of research. It is suggested that this course framework be used as a tool for building speech-language pathologist capacity in the use of evidence-based decision making.

from Evidence-Based Communication Assessment and Intervention

Building speech-language pathologist capacity for evidence-based practice: A unique graduate course approach

A speech-language pathology graduate-level course using the systematic review and meta-analytic process as a learning tool is described. The course design, content, activities, and pedagogical methods are discussed in depth. Three groups of students worked collaboratively to produce three systematic reviews in the area of language and literacy. This course provided a framework for the completion of the reviews and the development of the students as expert consumers of research. It is suggested that this course framework be used as a tool for building speech-language pathologist capacity in the use of evidence-based decision making.

from Evidence-Based Communication Assessment and Intervention

Australian Speech-Language Pathologists’ Perceptions and Experiences of Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Early Childhood Intervention

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) working in early childhood intervention are expected to have knowledge and skills across a number of areas and to engage in evidence-based practice. We explored the knowledge and perceptions of SLPs working with young children within Australian early childhood settings about augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), evidence-based practice, and barriers to such practice. Fourteen clinicians participated in group or individual interviews. Thematic analysis of the transcripts of these discussions revealed that they had a broad view of AAC and its benefits. Their reported assessment and intervention approaches reflected best practice as documented in the literature. The exception was in the implementation of family-centred practice. Although the participants involved families in their children’s intervention, many appeared to use a directive approach. There was also evidence of struggling with families’ negative attitudes about the use of AAC. A major barrier for these clinicians in implementing AAC and best practice was limited time in light of the many demands and expectations. Despite some frustration, these participants were passionate about their work and belief in the benefits of AAC for young children with varied communication difficulties. The results suggest that many expectations placed on clinicians within early childhood intervention settings may fail to take into account the everyday demands on their time, in a context of varied resources and support.

from AAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication

Current and prospective speech-language pathology students’ reports of exposure to speech-language pathology

This paper presents findings of an investigation into the amount of exposure to the speech-language pathology profession that is reported by current and prospective speech-language pathology students. This study investigated both therapeutic and social exposures to speech-language pathology (SLP) as both were considered to play a role in providing information about the profession (e.g., work settings, professional demographics and caseloads). The results showed that the greater majority of both the current and prospective speech-language pathology students had some type of exposure to speech-language pathology either prior to entering or prior to considering entering the speech-language pathology program. Furthermore, both the current and prospective speech-language pathology students reported being influenced by their prior exposure the speech-language pathology profession. Finally, the results showed that parents played a large role in career choice for the current and prospective students, and this may have also included influence through parents’ own exposure to speech-language pathology through work settings.

from the International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology

Roles of speech-languge pathologists and nurses in providing communication intervention for nonspeaking adults in acute care: A regional pilot study

This study investigated current practice patterns and opinions of best practice standards of nurses and speech-language pathologists (S-LPs) regarding management of nonspeaking adult patients in acute care. Data was comprised of questionnaires completed by 85 nurses and 34 hospital-based acute care S-LPs. Nurse respondents reported that they frequently facilitate hands-on communication intervention for nonspeaking patients. Most nurses agreed that quality of care would be enhanced if S-LPs were more involved in facilitating communication for acute care patients. Forty-eight percent of S-LPs and 49% of nurses reported that at their facilities, less than half of nonspeaking patients are routinely referred to speech-language pathology (S-LP), whereas 94% of S-LPs and 66% of nurses felt that nonspeaking patients should be referred to S-LP most of the time. Results suggest that S-LPs are spending increasing amounts of time in the area of dysphagia management and relatively minimal amounts of time providing communication intervention.

from the Canadian Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

Speech-language pathologists’ views on attrition from the profession

The aim of this study was to identify common themes in speech-language pathologists’ perceptions of factors that increase and decrease their experiences of job stress, their satisfaction with their jobs and the profession, and their opinions about why people chose to leave the speech-language pathology profession. The participants’ perceptions about the relationships between job stress, work satisfaction and job and profession retention were also explored. Sixty members of Speech Pathology Australia from a range of geographical and professional contexts were asked to participate in telephone interviews. Eighteen speech-language pathologists agreed to participate (30% response rate), and took part in semi-structured telephone interviews. Two researchers independently coded transcripts of the interviews for themes. Eight major themes were identified. These were positive aspects of the profession, workload, non-work obligations, effectiveness, recognition, support, learning and autonomy. The themes that emerged from analysis of these interviews provide new evidence about the positive and negative aspects of working as a speech-language pathologist, and provide preliminary insights into potential reasons as to why speech-language pathologists choose to remain in or leave the profession.

from the International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology

Roles of speech-languge pathologists and nurses in providing communication intervention for nonspeaking adults in acute care: A regional pilot study

Most nurses agreed that quality of care would be enhanced if S-LPs were more involved in facilitating communication for acute care patients. Forty-eight percent of S-LPs and 49% of nurses reported that at their facilities, less than half of nonspeaking patients are routinely referred to speech-language pathology (S-LP), whereas 94% of S-LPs and 66% of nurses felt that nonspeaking patients should be referred to S-LP most of the time. Results suggest that S-LPs are spending increasing amounts of time in the area of dysphagia management and relatively minimal amounts of time providing communication intervention.

from the Canadian Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology