Blog Archives

Ocular and cervical VEMPs: A study of 74 patients suffering from peripheral vestibular disorders

Conclusions
Ocular and cervical VEMPs provide complementary information about saccular and utricular otolithic function.

from Clinical Neurophysiology

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Ocular and cervical VEMPs: A study of 74 patients suffering from peripheral vestibular disorders

Conclusions
Ocular and cervical VEMPs provide complementary information about saccular and utricular otolithic function.

from Clinical Neurophysiology

Balance Rehabilitation by Moving Platform and Exercises in Patients With Neuropathy or Vestibular Deficit

Conclusions
Balance rehabilitation with either EX or powered platform is effective in patients with balance disorders of vestibular or neuropathic origin. These findings point to the value of either or both physical EXs and powered platform in increasing stability and potentially decrease the risk of falling in patients with neuropathy, for whom few results are documented in the literature.

from Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials: review

Conclusion: The benefits of vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing have already been established as regards the diagnosis and monitoring of several clinical conditions. Researchers continue to delve deeper into potential new clinical applications, with early results suggesting promising future developments.

from the Journal of Laryngology and Otology

Vestibular disorders in childhood and adolescents

The aim and objective of the study is to analyze the data of 145 vertiginous patients aged up to 18 years, which were examined at the Otoneurological Department of the Semmelweis University during the last 5 years. The study design for the analysis: the group of children (66 patients, aged up to 14 years) and group of adolescents (79 patients, ages between 14 and 18 years). Children and adolescents, who sent by otolaryngologists or pediatric neurologists, were examined. The detailed case history and routine physical examinations were followed by cochlear function tests. The vestibular test contained statokinetic test, spontaneous nystagmus with electronystagmographical (ENG) registration, positional and positioning nystagmus with Frenzel’s glasses, smooth pursuit eye movement test and caloric test with computer-based ENG. Most of the patients experienced true rotatory vertigo. The ratio of the dizziness (vertigo without direction) was 38% in the children’s and 44% in the adolescent group; 21 children and 31 adolescents had headache. Nausea and vomiting were frequent in both the groups: normal hearing was measured in 62% of children and in 82% of adolescents. The vestibular system was normal in 36% of the children’s group, and in 39% of the adolescents. In conclusion, it is important to realize that 64% of the children and 61% of the adolescents do have certain vestibular abnormalities. The most frequent cause of dizziness (24%) in the adolescent group is the extravestibular disorder-like panic disease and the anxiety disorder. At younger age, the most frequent disease that can cause vestibular symptoms is the migraine.

from the European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngologyl

International survey of vestibular rehabilitation therapists by the Barany Society Ad Hoc Committee on Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy

The goal of this study was to determine how occupational and physical therapists learn about vestibular rehabilitation therapy, their educational backgrounds, referral patterns, and their ideas about entry-level and advanced continuing education in vestibular rehabilitation therapy. The Barany Society Ad Hoc Committee for Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy invited therapists around the world to complete an E-mail survey. Participants were either known to committee members or other Barany Society members, known to other participants, identified from their self-listings on the Internet, or volunteered after reading notices published in publications read by therapists. Responses were received from 133 therapists in 19 countries. They had a range of educational backgrounds, practice settings, and referral patterns. Few respondents had had any training about vestibular rehabilitation during their professional entry-level education. Most respondents learned about vestibular rehabilitation from continuing education courses, interactions with their colleagues, and reading. All of them endorsed the concept of developing standards and educating therapists about vestibular anatomy and physiology, vestibular diagnostic testing, vestibular disorders and current intervention strategies. Therefore, the Committee recommends the development of international standards for education and practice in vestibular rehabilitation therapy.

from Vestibular Research

Rehabilitation after acute vestibular disorders

Conclusions: These results would appear to support the effectiveness of a supervised exercise programme for patients following acute onset of vestibular disturbance. A correlation was found in both groups between dynamic gait index results and anxiety. In our experience, a rehabilitation programme seems to reduce dependence on visual cues for postural control.

from the Journal of Laryngology and Otology

Advances in pediatric audiological and vestibular disorders

from the International Journal of Audiology

This Article does not have an abstract.

The diagnosis of autoimmune inner ear disease: evidence and critical pitfalls

from the European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology

Abstract The purpose of this paper is to review the current diagnostic work-up for patients with suspected Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED). AIED is a rare disease accounting for less than 1% of all cases of hearing impairment or dizziness, characterized by a rapidly progressive, often fluctuating, bilateral SNHL over a period of weeks to months. While specific tests for autoimmunity to the inner ear would be valuable, at the time of writing, there are none that are both commercially available and proven to be useful. Thus far, most of the identified antigens lack a clear association with localized inner ear pathology and the diagnosis of AIED is based either on clinical criteria and/or on a positive response to steroids. For clinical practice, we recommend an antigen-non-specific test battery including blood test for autoimmune disorders and for conditions that resemble autoimmune disorders. Nevertheless, if financial resources are limited, a very restricted work-up study may have a similar efficiency.